Aerial Yoga

Aerial Yoga combines acrobatic arts and anti-gravity asana, however, it’s also an accessible practice that can help you find more length in your spine and safe alignment in your poses

Use of aerial props was first introduced by BKS Iyengar who tied ropes to walls and later hung straps from the ceiling to facilitate and enhance poses in relation to one’s need and abilities

Aerial Yoga is a mix of yoga, acrobatics, Pilates and physical therapy. Mostly, it is easier than normal yoga because we use swings to support our bodyweight so our muscles don’t work as hard. The swings allow us to move more freely, stretch easier, attain correct alignment and do advanced poses such as handstands and inversions. Aerial offers great therapeutic benefits by using gravity to stretch the spine, relieve back pain and heal injuries

We begin with detailed alignment instruction of basic aerial yoga poses with advanced options, which are ordered in a developmental sequence

Our cushioned swings are more comfortable and supportive than most hammocks, silks, and swings

WHAT WE TEACH
– Safety tips with aerial

– Warm Up Postures
– Standing Postures
– Flying Postures
– One foot hooked behind Postures
– Both feet hooked behind Postures
– Supine Postures
– Spinal Twist Postures
– Inversion Postures

– Transitions from one pose to another
– Correct Alignment

– Therapeutic Usage of Aerial Yoga

TEACHING METHODOLOGY

• Lesson plan
• Assignments
• Practice teaching
• Feedback
• Group discussion
• Question and answer
• Homework

– Teaching environment; Preparing the Classroom
– Managing the dynamics of the teacher-aspirant relationship.
– Knowledge and Demonstration ability; techniques of teaching
– Familiarity and ability to design and implement group programs.
– Familiarity and ability to design and implement an individual’s need-based program
– Familiarity with group dynamics and allied techniques of communication skills
– Time management, and the establishment of priorities and boundaries.
– Familiarity with techniques to address the specific needs of individual participants, to the degree possible in a group setting